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I'm at a loss, we'ved owned our GC WJ for around 5 years, 125k on the clock, it's my sons truck for getting back and forth to school. When we got it it was scary to drive on the highway, like a wet sponge, we put a 3" Zone kit on it, a set of JK rims and 32" MT"s, and it was great - untill about a year ago.

That's when we first experienced Death Wobble.

Since then we upgraded the adjustable track arm to a JKS, we replaced the axles and bearings, upper and lower ball joints, tie rod ends, drag link end, new upper control arms, steering box, and we just put in a 4" drop pitnam arm and new 32" Goodyear Wranglers and had it realigned. It's still doing it...

THe shop recommended trying to replace the steering box again which I'll do after work tomorrow, but driving the truck the box feels nice and snug, no play

I've driven lifted trucks for almost forty years, we currently have a JKU with fortys, and a TJ with 37's, I've never experienced anything like this, any input appreciated
 

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There should be a lot of info about your problem here at the forum. Try a detailed search. I have always cured my death wobble with a stronger steering shock. I have heard of tie rods flexing. Maybe the toe adjustment could be played with a little. Also I would study the alignment sheet very closely. A 4 wheel alignment would be a must. The company you bought your lift components from may have some answers. Den
 

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I'm at a loss, we'ved owned our GC WJ for around 5 years, 125k on the clock, it's my sons truck for getting back and forth to school. When we got it it was scary to drive on the highway, like a wet sponge, we put a 3" Zone kit on it, a set of JK rims and 32" MT"s, and it was great - untill about a year ago.

That's when we first experienced Death Wobble.

Since then we upgraded the adjustable track arm to a JKS, we replaced the axles and bearings, upper and lower ball joints, tie rod ends, drag link end, new upper control arms, steering box, and we just put in a 4" drop pitnam arm and new 32" Goodyear Wranglers and had it realigned. It's still doing it...

THe shop recommended trying to replace the steering box again which I'll do after work tomorrow, but driving the truck the box feels nice and snug, no play

I've driven lifted trucks for almost forty years, we currently have a JKU with fortys, and a TJ with 37's, I've never experienced anything like this, any input appreciated
Hi upalms!
I struggled with Death Wobble on my WJ for almost a year and finally found a couple things that, once addressed, cured my death wobble for good. I've been driving death wobble free for almost three years now.

The first is that the JKS bushings are too soft. If you look underneath while someone turns back and forth you can see those bushings compress and allow a small amount of movement. I replaced the JKS with an Ironrock Offroad track bar and their upgraded flex joint which allows NO side to side movement at all. It's a very solid setup. Here are the links:

WJ Track Bar
Flex Joint

The second issue I had was the bolt holes on both the axle and frame where getting wallowed out and allowing the bolt to rock back and forth EVEN when torqued properly. Trying to get that bolt to move with your hands is one thing but it doesn't even come close to road forces. Kevin's Off Road provides a track bar bolt upgrade kit. You essentially drill out the current holes and use the much larger hardware in the kit. You could probably source your own hardware too if you have access to a good hardware place with grade 8 bolts.

Here is the Kit

Keep in mind that if you also buy the Ironrock track bar you will need to drill out the joint balls to allow the bigger bolts to fit.

Good luck to ya!
-JB
 
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Mine drove great for years. Then started. The track bar bushings were bad. I got the harder ones from Kevins off road and helped for a while until those wore out. The squeak bad tho even with special grease. I recently cut off that bushing system and welded in a Johnny joint set up. Helped a lot and silent again. Also a good steering stabilizer is a must. Tires need to be balanced perfectly as well. It’s the nature of a WJ. Especially when lifted.
 

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I am not here often so I may not see a reply.
I owned a ZJ for 11 years and put 130k very hard miles on it (odo 178k when sold).

Death wobble is not specific to a Jeep model or Jeeps in general but rather any solid front axle vehicle: Jeeps, Broncos, Scout, Ford trucks, etc.

Biggest myth of all: replacing steering stabilizer fixes death wobble. Yes, it can help and minimize but it does not solve. In fact, if everything is working correctly, should not even need a stabilizer. Its purpose is to reduce bump steer.

The wobble is a result of slack somewhere. Axle hits a bump and this sends the axle into a natural sine wave (bouncing/hopping, whatever you like to call it). Tire balance can amplify but it is usually slack somewhere else. Never found alignment to have any impact but many will argue this.

*** I do not recommend this but if you were to accelerate when it happens, it stops about 85 mph (depending on tire size) which is where the sine wave normalizes.

Each time it happened to me, the fix was something different because as with most vehicles, parts were wearing out, some faster than others:
track bar, tie rods, steering link, shocks, and the one that really surprised me was passenger upper control arm frame side bushing (was completely gone).

Rubber bushings ride better, flex better, and make less noise but urethane stops the bushing flex and forces the axle to move the way it was intended. As noted above, definitely check the bolt holes (it is possible to repair these, just search internet). There are also some graphite injected urethane bushings that usually don't squeak.

I ran Procrap lower arms with urethane bushings but didn't realize the bolts were bound up for many years which is why it road so harsh. Replaced uppers with Teraflex which also had urethane bushings. Another surprising thing was it road smoother at 7" of lift than it ever did at 3-4" but likely because by that time I had replaced every suspension component and the lower arm bolts were not bound up.

Grab your floor creeper, a friend to turn the steering wheel, and find what is moving around. It will take some time but it's there somewhere.
 

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Dracer69 covered a lot of ground and I agree with "their" post.

I also agree with many other posts (in this and other forums) that loose connections allow it to happen, and even my neighbor says his Durango and now Nissan Armada have death wobble occasionally.

Earlier I replaced the tie rod (which was rusting out on the center part) and ends, with Moog, and the stabilizer shock with Moog (SSD107) which, as expected, didn't help, but may have reduced the times it happened.

I took my 2000 WJ into an alignment place for the death wobble.
They replaced the (I think) lower track bar bolt with a larger one and that reduced it to rarely happening.
A year ago it started happening again, maybe the other (upper?) track bar bolt needs a larger (tighter) one. Recently, I haven't experienced it. (Makes no sense to me.)

For anyone interested, I noticed that what sets it off is hitting a bump, even the "joint" between one section of road and the next, especially if it hits both tires at the same time AND if you're accelerating, or under power, even just maintaining speed. (Essentially, when the drive-train is under torque/pressure.) It commonly happens at 50MPH, but often doesn't happen above 75 (drive like a bat out of H***).
If you back off the accelerator (gas pedal) just before you hit the joint, it often doesn't start.

I also noticed that any interruption to the only the left or or only the right tires, while it's happening, can cause it to stop. So move left or right to hit the warning ribs outside the main lane (the ones that wake you up to say you're going off the road) or the raised reflectors between lanes. Even a hole in the road can upset the harmonic, as long as it affects only one side - basically, being out of rhythm with the other side.

Finally, (speaking as an engineer, which I am), as others have said, replacing with larger or harder/more robust, will only help until, things wear out and loosen again.

Now the vehicles I've driven all have mechanical suspensions. Maybe the active suspension vehicles don't experience this, or can be programmed to stop it when it starts, like ABS brakes are supposed to stop skidding. Maybe even putting an active shock on one side could help, like hitting the outside of the lane ribs.

[Sometimes I think it would be cool to remove the axles entirely and put an individual electric motor at each wheel. Eliminate the transmission, transfer case, drive-train, etc. I've never done rock/log climbing, or mud off-road, but think of having individual tire rotation control. Kind of like the gantry that moves the rockets from the vertical assembly building to the launch pad, or, isn't the lunar rover built that way?]
 
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